About Lee Street - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Neighborhood - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Properties - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Available Apartments - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Apartment Finder - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Apartment Application - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Illinois Apartment Rentals Lee Street Documents Needed - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Northwestern Apartment Rentals Lee Street Sample Lease - Chicago Apartments for Rent - University Apartment Rentals Lee Street FAQs - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Getting Established - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Local Attractions - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Finding a Compatible Roommate - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Residents Only - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Find Us - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Lee Street Contact Us - Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston Apartment Rentals Chicago Apartments for Rent - Evanston, Illinois Apartment Rentals

  

Lee Street Apartment Rentals
 Chicago and Evanston Apartment Rentals
Vintage Rental Apartments   Chicago   Rogers Park   Evanston
Chicago Apartments
for Rent. We allow Pets.

Lee Street Home

About Us

Our
Neighborhood

Apartment
Finder

Available
Apartments

Application
Forms

Our Properties

FAQS

Moving In

Maintenance Request

Chicagoland's
Attractions

Our Lease

Residents Only

Find Us

Contact Us


SEARCH SITE

OFFICE: (773) 761-3300    FAX: 773) 465-7733
7601 North Eastlake Terrace    Chicago, IL 60626

 Scrolling Monitor
Lee Street
Lee Street Management's Glossary of Internet Terms


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

"."
The ".", or "dot", is generally used to signify the highest level of the domain name space.  The "." represents the total of all named and unnamed Internet space available.  It is also used as an identifier of subdivisions in a domain name.  For example: mydomain.leestreet.com

.com
.com is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) that was originally intended for commercial entities and businesses.  Currently, any individual or organization can register a domain name in the .com Top Level Domain.

.edu
.edu is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) in which only 4 year accredited universities (educational institutions) may register a domain name.

.gif
.gif is a common file format for graphics that are used on the World Wide Web.

.gov
.gov is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) that is reserved for use by the United States government for non-military Web sites.

.mil
.mil is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) that is reserved for use by the United States Military for military Web sites.

.net
.net is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) that was originally intended for entities that concentrated on network and Internet administration.  Currently, any individual or organization can register a domain name in the Net Top Level Domain.

.org
.org is a global TLD (Top Level Domain) that was originally intended for not-for-profit organizations. Currently, any individual or organization can register a domain name in the .org Top Level Domain.

.tv
.tv is the standardized 2-character abbreviation for
the small southwest Pacific islands country of Tuvalu, used as their Top Level Domain in the Domain Name System. There are many such two-letter, country-specific TLD's available and they function the same as the more common global TLD's.  For example:the URL's http://www.leestreet.com and http://www.leestreet.tv will both be resolved by any domain name server and may both deliver the same website content to your browser. Recently, the TV ccTLD was sold to Verisign.

The domain name eastlake.tv is still available for sale, if anybody in the neighborhood is interested.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

A Record
An A Record is the section of a zone file in which one or more IP Addresses are specified for a domain name.  When referring to a domain name, the terms "A Record" and "IP Address" are often thought of as interchangeable.

Administrative Contact
The administrative contact associated with a domain name is the individual or contact responsible for handling the administrative aspects of a domain name, such as updating Contact Information and confirming certain domain name modifications.  The administrative contact information is kept on file with the registrar of the domain name and is also visible in the WHOIS database.

Alias
A Domain Alias, which is specified in the C Name section of a zone file, is an extension to a domain name that allows you to create derivatives of the domain that can be pointed to the same or any other domain name on the Internet.  An example of a Domain Alias is www.leesteet.com, where "www" functions as the Domain Alias and accesses the same Web site as leestreet.com.

Anonymous FTP
Anonymous FTP is a method of using the Internet FTP (File Transfer Protocol) to access publicly available files without identifying oneself.  When using an FTP program to gain access to a server that allows Anonymous FTP, a user can enter "anonymous" as the FTP user name to log in.

Arbitration
Arbitration is a method of legal dispute resolution outside the court system where both parties agree in advance that the decision, known as an award, will be binding on both parties.

ARIN
ARIN is an acronym for the American Registry for Internet Numbers, and administers the IP Address numbers for the Americas, the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa.

ASO
The ASO, or Address Supporting Organization of ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, is a review board that is affiliated with ICANN in terms of IP Address regulation.

Authoritative Name Server(s)
Authoritative Name Server(s) are the Name Server(s) on file with the registry for a specific domain name that are considered the authoritative source for that domain name's zone file information on the Internet.
 Please see Primary Server and Secondary Server.

Authentication
Authentication is the process of verifying a person's identity, especially when related to certain rights or privileges on the Internet.  For example, a register's user name and password, as well as the contact's e-mail address are used to authenticate a person's identity when domain name modifications are initiated.

Authorization
Authorization is the act of assigning privileges or rights to an individual or organization, which then allows them to exercise certain privileges.  For example, when a resident of a Lee Street Management building requests entry to the "Residents Only" section of this website, they are issued a User Name and a Password that will authorize our servers to permit them access to those pages.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Bandwidth
Bandwidth is a measure of the amount of data that can be sent through a particular system at any one time. Generally, bandwidth is measured in bits per second (bps).

Banner
A banner is usually a static or dynamic graphic image on a Web site that advertises goods or services for that Web site or another Web site.  Generally, visitors to the site can click on the banner graphic in order to visit another Web site or Web page associated with that service. The referring website is then compensated for any banner click-through by the receiving website. Many website visitors find banners annoying and will avoid websites that employ them.

Billing Contact
The billing contact associated with a domain name is the individual or contact responsible for handling the billing/payment aspects of a domain name, such as initial and recurring billing.  The billing contact information is kept on file with the registrar of the domain name and can be changed at any time.

BIND
BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) is a software program developed to facilitate the resolution of domain names to IP Addresses on the Internet and is used by most Domain Name Servers.

Browser
Browser software gives Internet users access to view and interact with various types of information on the Internet.  Web browsers make use of HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) to communicate with Web servers on the Internet, allowing users to access and share available online resources.
 See Web Browser

The browser type, release version and operating system (if available)
on the computer you are using right now is:



You can prove the above by opening this page in a different browser.
New information will be displayed.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

C Name
A C Name, also known as a "canonical name" or "Domain Alias," is the section in a domain name's zone file that specifies whether a subset of the domain name should point to the same or another domain name (location) on the Internet.  An example of a C Name is mydomain.leestreet.com.

Canonical
Please see C Name.

ccTLD
A country code Top Level Domain is a TLD consisting of the standardized 2-character abbreviation for a country. For example, .ky represents the Cayman Islands, and TV represents Tovalu. ccTLDs can be used in the same manner as a gTLD.

Class A Network
A Class A Network is an interconnected series of machines on the Internet that is able to hold up to 16 million IP Addresses.

Class B Network
A Class B Network is an interconnected series of machines on the Internet that is able to hold up to 65 thousand IP Addresses.

Class C Network
A Class C Network is an interconnected series of machines on the Internet that is able to hold up to 256 IP Addresses.

Client
A client on the Internet represents one half of a relationship known as the client/server relationship.  Typically, the client (such as a Web browser) makes a request for information from a server.  The server, in turn, delivers information back to the client.  The Internet is largely based on this concept.

Client/Server
The client/server relationship describes a process that allows most functions on the Internet to occur.  Typically, the client program places a request for information or a task to a server.  On the Internet, this can occur from 2 separate/distant locations using networking technologies as well as the use of TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol).  E-mail programs and e-mail servers, as well as Web browsers and Web servers are some widely used examples of a client/server relationship.

Cobrand
A leestreet.com cobrand Web site is a partnered domain name Web site that gives management companies that partner with leestreet.com the ability to offer apartment rental services through leestreet.com's administrative, leasing or referral systems.

Confirmation E-mail

Generally, any forms or other contact instruments used from within any LeeStreet.com website will receive an e-mail confirming our receipt of your message and may include a specific response. The purpose of a confirmation e-mail is to establish a working communication loop between server and user.

Contact/Agent
A contact, or agent, is the individual or group of individuals listed with particular types of Contact Information associated with this website.  These contacts are categorized as personnel, leasing agent, maintenance, legal, or administrator contacts.

Copyright Law
A set of laws controlling literary, photographic, software or other creative works granting copyright ownership and protection to the originators, for a limited period, whereby he is invested with the sole right to multiply or otherwise distribute them for gain.

Counter
A counter is a program that counts and displays the number of visitors to a particular Web page.

Country Code
A country code is the standardized 2-character abbreviation for a country, used as their Top Level Domain in the Domain Name System.  For example, KY represents the Cayman Islands, and TV represents Tuvalu.

Cybersquatter
A cybersquatter is an individual that has reserved one or more commercially viable domain name(s) with the intent to sell them to the individual or organization willing to pay the highest price for the name. In some cases a cybersquatter may hold a name for the singular purpose of precluding it's availability to a competing service or user. In many cases, the domain name that has been reserved by the cybersquatter has already been trademarked or service marked by another organization.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Destination URL
Destination URL is a term used when referring to the URL to which a domain name will be forwarded or redirected.  By the nature of the service, the destination URL is visible in the browser window after the domain name has been redirected.

Dig
Dig is a utility that allows a user to query the Domain Name System in order to find the authoritative Domain Name Servers responsible for a domain name.

Distributed Database
A distributed database is a database that is stored on more than one computer, typically on a network like the Internet.
 The Domain Name System on the Internet is an example of a distributed database.  Basically, each computer on the Internet that has information about domain name to IP Address mapping is a component of the database.  There is no one Domain Name Server that is responsible for maintaining the entire DNS database.

DNS Lookup
Please see Nslookup.

DNS
DNS is generally considered an acronym for the Domain Name System, but can also be used to denote a Domain Name Server.

DNS Administrator
A DNS Administrator is the individual or group of individuals that are responsible for creating, maintaining and updating zone file records on a Domain Name Server for domain names for which that server is authoritative.

DNSO
DNSO is the acronym for the Domain Name Supporting Organization of ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers.  The DNSO functions as an advisory board for ICANN in relation to the Domain Name System.

Domain
A domain is an area of jurisdiction on the Internet, which can be made up of anywhere from one domain name to all of the space available on the Internet.  For example, .com is an area of jurisdiction (domain), and each domain name within the .com TLD is within that domain.

Domain Manager
A domain manager is a utility developed by domain name registrars to allow registrants to have direct control over various domain name settings and information.  It provides their customers the functionality to edit their Domain Name Server Information, IP Addresses, Domain Aliases, MX Records, Contact and Billing Information.

Domain Name
A domain name is a unique alphanumeric name used to identify a particular computer (i.e. Web server or mail server) on the Internet.
Domain names allow Internet users to type in a name, such a leestreet.com, which is eventually resolved to a specific, numeric IP Address such as 24.148.47.156.  The purpose of domain names is to allow ordinary users connected to the Internet to find Web sites and send e-mail to addresses with familiar names such as "mybrand.com" or "leestreet.com" without having to memorize the numerical addresses assigned to computers or servers on the Internet.

Domain Name Broker
A Domain Name Broker is an organization that mediates the sale and purchase of domain names for individuals or companies interested in buying or selling domain names. Similar to a real estate broker, a domain name broker serves as a central resource for buyers and sellers of intellectual property.

Domain Name Dispute
A domain name dispute is a complaint concerning the impact of a registered domain name on a registered trademark or service mark.  A domain name dispute may arise in an instance of an Internet user registering a trademarked or service marked word, phrase or name as a domain name.  If the legal registrant of the trademarked or service marked domain name submits a complaint about registrant of the domain name, the name is subject to dispute.

Domain Name Services Agreement
A domain name Services Agreement is a binding contract put forth by a domain name registrar that must be agreed to by the registrant before the registration of a domain name can be processed.

Domain Name Server
See Name Server.

Domain Name Space
The domain name space is the sum total of all space available on the Internet, whether it is in use or not, which is arranged in a hierarchical "tree" of areas of jurisdiction, called domains.

Domain Name System
The Domain Name System, a distributed database, is the Internet-wide methodology that allows Internet users to type an easy-to-remember, alphanumeric domain name into a Web browser or other Internet utility, which is translated in order to locate the numeric IP Address of a computer on the Internet.


Domain Trafficking
Domain trafficking is the common practice of selling a registered domain name to another party, either independently or through a domain name broker for a sum of money decided on between the two parties.

Dot Address
A dot address is another term used to describe an IP Address, in which a numerical Web address is delimited by four sets of numbers, each ranging between 0 and 255, separated by dots. An example of an IP Address is 24.148.47.156.

Dot or "."
"." is used to denote the top of the domain name space hierarchy, which includes all the space available on the Internet at any given time.  Additionally, in a URL, the "." indicates a division between segments of the address.

Dotted Octet
Dotted octet is the phrase generally used to describe the format of an IP Address, as well as the sequence of IP Addresses that can be allocated on the Internet.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

E-mail
E-mail, or electronic mail, is a widely used process of sending text messages and attached files from one user to another through the InternetPOP3 and SMTP are common protocols used for retrieving and sending e-mail

E-mail Forwarding
E-mail forwarding is a service offered by most ISPs and e-mail service providers that allows e-mail sent to one e-mail address to be redirected to another e-mail address on the Internet.

Encryption
Encryption is the process of converting data into a format that can only be understood by an individual or group with the proper key to decipher it. The process of deciphering the information by the recipient is called decryption.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

FAQ
FAQ is an acronym for Frequently Asked Questions.

Forward DNS lookup
Forward DNS lookup is a process by which an Internet user queries a domain name to map it to the IP Address that is associated with it.  See Reverse DNS lookup.

Frames
A web author can cause a page to be divided into "frames", each of which can receive an HTML-constructed window of information. On most web sites that use "frames", the web designer provides all the content in each of the frames. Typically a small frame to the left is used as a menu, and a large frame in the center and right of the screen contains the main body of text, all of which originates from the same web site.

FTP (File Transfer Protocol)
FTP, or File Transfer Protocol, is a standard Internet protocol, or method, that uses the TCP/IP protocol to transfer files or programs from one computer on the Internet to another.  A common use of FTP is to upload or transfer Web site files and images from a computer to a Web server, so that other Internet users can access the Web site.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

gTLD
gTLD is an acronym for generic (global) Top Level Domain. These TLDs are not country specific and can be registered internationally.
 The six gTLDs are .com, net, .org, .gov, mil and .edu.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Hit
A hit is the term used for each instance of an Internet user requesting a file from a Web server. If a Web page has five images contained in it, accessing that page with a Web browser will count as six hits (the HTML file + 5 image files) in the Web server's log.

Home Page
A home page, also referred to as an index page, is the term used to identify the first page accessed when visiting a Web site made up of many individual pages.  The home page of a Web site typically provides the means to navigate the rest of the site. An example of a home page URL is http://www.leestreet.com/  The final forward slash indicates that there may be unlimited number of files, pages or images, etc. that may follow, such as http://www.leestreet.com/pop/school.php, and so on.

Host (Domain Alias)
Please see Domain Alias.

Host
A host is a general term used for a computer connected to the Internet that has access to send and receive queries to and from other computers.  An example of a host would be a Web server.

Hostmaster
Hostmaster is a term often used to describe an individual or group of individuals that is responsible for handling e-mail related to network administration issues.

HREF
An H-Reference links one web page or site to another page or site. An HREF link is the kind we are all accustomed to. It is a region on the screen which, when selected by the visitor, causes the present screen to be erased and causes an entirely new screen to be loaded. This glossary is rich with HREF links.

HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)
HTML, the acronym for Hypertext Markup Language, is the language used for creating Web pages, which consists of a series of codes or tags that are interpreted by a Web browser for the purposes of displaying a Web page's content.

HTTP (Hypertext T
ransfer Protocol) HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is a protocol, or method, of transferring hypertext files from an HTTP server to an HTTP client, such as a Web browser, across the Internet.  HTTP is the most commonly used protocol on the Internet.

Hypertext
Hypertext is a form of text that allows users to link or connect text in one document or Web page to text on the same or another page.  The most common instance of hypertext is on Web pages, where links appear as underlined text; clicking on a link typically allows the user to access other relevant information.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority)
The IANA is the authority originally responsible for overseeing the Domain Name System, Top Level Domains and the Internet's root servers.
 Please see ICANN.

ICANN
The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is the independent, nonprofit organization that was formed to take responsibility for Internet governance, including assigning IP Address, Domain Name System management and domain name allocation.

Impression
An impression is a term used to describe a page view on a Web site.  Whereas a hit describes a request for a file on a Web page, an impression describes an instance of a visitor viewing the whole page. Information about impressions is used to determine the number of visitors that are coming to a particular Web site.

Intellectual property
Intellectual property is generally some sort of information or data that is given the same consideration as goods and services in terms of legal protection against infringement and copyrights. For example, the entire contents of this website, LeeStreet.com, would be considered intellectual property.

Internet
The Internet is the sum total of interconnected computer networks that allows a user, connected at any computer on any network, to access any other computer on any other network.  This "network of networks" uses the TCP/IP protocols and evolved from the ARPAnet of the late 1960's.

Internet Address
Please see URL.

Internet Protocol (IP) Numbers
Please see IP Address.

Internet Service Provider (ISP)
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is a company, individual or organization that may provide Internet access, Web Hosting services and e-mail services, typically in exchange for a fee.

Internet Society (ISOC)
The Internet Society is a professional membership organization that focuses on the goal of cooperation and coordination between all organizations involved in developing the Internet.

InterNIC
InterNIC (Internet Network Information Center), is a registered service mark of the US Department of Commerce.  The InterNIC, formerly responsible for registering and maintaining the .com, Net and .org  Top Level Domains names is currently an informational Web site established to provide the public with information about domain name registration.  The site is accessible at www.internic.net.

IP
IP is an abbreviation for Internet Protocol, which is a protocol, or method, of transporting data from one computer to another over the Internet.

IP Address
An IP (Internet Protocol) Address, or IP Number, is a numerical locator for computers, Domain Name Servers, e-mail servers and Web servers on the Internet.  Every machine on the Internet can be located by a unique IP Address, which consists of four sets of numbers, each of which range from 0 to 255, separated by dots (for example, 24.148.47.156).

By the way, the IP address of the computer you are using right now is: Your IP address reflects as : 54.205.60.171
The page you requested was: /about/glossary.php
The browser you are using is CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)

IP Number
Please see IP Address.

ISO
ISO is the universally accepted 'short name', not an acronym, for the International Organization for Standardization.  This organization is made up of representatives from each member country and works toward the goal of developing standardization that facilitate the exchange of goods, services and intellectual property between countries.

ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a document issued by the International Organization for Standardization that sets guidelines for the format of country code TLDs.  This document states that each country is assigned a unique, 2 letter code as its Top Level Domain.

ISP
Please see Internet Service Provider.

ISP Manager
ISP manager is a utility that is used to assist domain name holders in managing various aspects of their domain names.  The application can modify DNS Information and set zone file entries for domain names registered through their registrar's systems and/or for which their registrar's Domain Name Servers are authoritative.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Java
Java is an object-oriented programming language used to create applications that are compatible with being distributed throughout a network or the Internet.

Java Applet
A Java Applet is a small program that can be returned to a user via a Web browser.  These client driven mini-programs were designed with the ability to perform simple functions, without having to initiate a subsequent request to the server.

Jpeg
A jpeg file is a common, compressed graphic format that is easily viewed on the Internet.  .jpg is the file extension for the file type jpeg.

.jpg
.jpg is the file extension for the file type jpeg. A jpeg file is a common, compressed graphic format that is easily viewed on the Internet.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

K
There are no entries for the letter K.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Lame Delegation
Lame delegation is a term used to describe an instance of assigning, to a registered domain name, Domain Name Servers that do not contain a zone file for that name.  In this instance, even though the domain name has been assigned valid Domain Name Server, the domain name is not able to be resolved on the Internet.

Lee Street Management
Lee Street Management is the name of the organization that assembled and presented this Glossary of Internet Terms. It is intended for exclusive use on this LeeStreet.com website. Please do not copy. See our Terms of Use if you have any questions about Lee Street Management's copyrighted materials. Thank you.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

MX Record
An MX Record, or Mail Exchange record, is a section of a domain name's zone file (a Name Server entry for a domain name) whose entries specify the mail server(s) on the Internet responsible for e-mail services for a specific domain name.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Name Resolution
Please see resolve/resolution.

Name Server
A Name Server is another name for a Domain Name Server.  A domain Name Server is responsible for storing and/or distributing zone file information on the Internet.  Connecting to a Web site on the Internet using your Web browser typically involves name servers on the Internet communicating and translating domain names to their corresponding IP Addresses.

Network
A Network is a system of interconnected computers and/or other networkable devices that can all communicate with one another.  A network may stand alone, or may be connected to the Internet or another network.

NIC
The acronym NIC stands for Network Information Center, which is a general term for any organization or group that provides information, services and/or registry services to the general public.

NIC Handle
A NIC handle is the account identifier used by Network Solutions, Inc. for tracking and customer contact purposes.  Other registrars do not require NIC handles in order to process domain name registrations.

NIC Tracking Number
A NIC Tracking Number is an identifier used by Network Solutions, Inc. in the processing of domain name registrations and modifications.  NIC Tracking Numbers are not necessary for domain name registrations registered through other registrars.

Nslookup
Nslookup is an application that allows a user to enter a domain name in order to determine the IP Address that is associated with that domain name.  For example, if leestreet.com were entered, it would be translated into 24.148.47.156.
 Please see reverse dnslookup.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Organizational Contact
The organizational contact associated with a domain name is the organization or group, if any, that is associated with the registered domain name.  The organizational contact information is kept on file with the registrar of the domain name and is also visible in the WHOIS database.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Packet
A packet is a small data package used in transmitting information on the Internet from the source to the destination.
 Please see TCP/IP.

Ping
Ping is a diagnostic utility used to determine whether a domain name or IP Address is available and/or responding to requests on the Internet. The ping utility sends information, in the form of a packet, to the Internet Address that you are running the utility for.  If the information is returned, it is an indicator that the computer at the specified IP Address or domain name is active and can receive and send information on the Internet.  If there is a loss of data, or if no data is returned, it is typically an indicator that the computer at the IP Address or domain name being queried is not active or functioning correctly.

POP/POP3
POP, or post office protocol, is the name of a method for retrieving electronic mail from the Internet, which functions as a client/server protocol.  E-mail is stored on a mail server until a user connects to the server with an e-mail client (program) to retrieve the e-mail  Whereas SMTP is the protocol commonly used for sending mail, POP is the method commonly used for retrieving mail.  POP3 is the most recent version of post office protocol.

Postmaster
The Postmaster is typically an individual responsible for administering electronic mail accounts on a mail server with the ability to establish user names and passwords and set account defaults and preferences.  The postmaster is considered the administrator of email accounts within a domain name and is responsible for adding and removing users.

Primary Server
A primary server is one of the Domain Name Servers associated with a pair of Name Servers.  Generally, Domain Name Servers are grouped in pairs, with a primary and a secondary server.  The primary Name Server is responsible for updating the secondary Name Server with any new zone file information or modifications that have been submitted by the DNS administrator.

Propagation Time
Propagation time is the amount of time required for a domain name's registration and/or changes to DNS Information to be distributed throughout the Domain Name System.  For example, new .com, Net and .org domain name registrations typically require 24-72 hours to be updated on and propagate throughout the Internet's 13 root servers.

Protocol
A protocol is a set of standards or rules that state how data is to be communicated between end points in a network. A protocol is similar to using a standardized language, or method.  Examples of commonly used protocols on the Internet include TCP/IP, HTTP and FTP.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Q
There are no entries for the letter Q.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Recursion
Recursion is the name of the process through which certain Domain Name Servers are configured to search for and resolve domain names.

Register
See Registration.


Registrant
The Registrant is the individual or organization to whom a specific domain name is registered with a registry. Once the registrant has registered the domain name, paid the associated fees and met certain conditions, the individual or organization holds the domain name for use for a specific period of time and can use the domain name for such purposes as Web hosting and e-mail.

Registrar
A Registrar is an organization or company that is either authorized by ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names & Numbers, an organization dedicated to Internet governance) to provide registration services for all the .net, .org and .com global Top-Level Domain names, or is authorized by its respective government to register domain name.  A registrar must also be authorized by the proper registry to act as an agent of the registry to process domain name registration, where the agent is not a reseller.  The registrar also has the responsibility to create and maintain a WHOIS database containing contact information associated with the domain name.

Registration
Registration is the process by which an individual or organization purchases the right to use a domain name for a specified period of time.  Domain Name registrations are typically processed through a registrar and, in general, require a registration fee, Contact Information, acceptance of a Services Agreement and, in some cases, meeting certain conditions or requirements.

Registration Fee
A registration fee is the amount of money charged by a registrar or the organization authorized by a TLD's respective government to register domain name.  Registration fees vary among TLDs.

Registry
A Registry is a regional organization or entity that is responsible for assigning domain names and Internet Addresses and is under contract from its respective government to control domain name registration.
 Registry responsibilities include recording and updating domain names and Internet Addresses, as well as the information associated with them, on the root servers.

Request for Comments (RFC)
Request For Comments is the process and subsequent documentation that occurs when creating a new Internet standard.  Various committees draft and review these documents before acceptance as a formal RFC.

Resolve/Resolution
Resolution is the name of the process used to translate a domain name into its corresponding IP, or numerical, Address, in locating a computer on the Internet.  For example, if one were to enter the domain name leestreet.com into a Web browser, leestreet.com would be resolved by a Domain Name Server to its proper IP Address in order to connect the user to the correct Web server containing the leestreet.com Web site.

Reverse DNS Lookup
Reverse DNS (Domain Name System) lookup is a process by which an Internet user queries an IP Address to map it to the domain name that is associated with it.  See NSlookup.

Root
The root domain is the top of the hierarchy of the domain name space. The root domain, which is often represented by "." is the sum total of all domain name space available on the Internet.

Root Cache
The root cache is the file on a root server that contains information about what Domain Name Servers are authoritative for domain names.

Root Domain
The root domain is the top of the hierarchy of the domain name space.  The root domain, which is often represented by ".", is the sum total of all domain name space available on the Internet.

Root Server
A root server is a computer running software that enables it to maintain and distribute information about what Domain Name Servers are authoritative for domain names.

Root Server System
The root server system is a group of 13 file servers that contain a master list of domain names in the .com, Net and .org domains and the Domain Name Servers that are authoritative for them.  These 13 servers are ultimately responsible for informing querying Domain Name Servers of where to find authoritative information for gTLD and where to locate the authoritative sources for ccTLD domain names. The 'A' root server is updated daily with new gTLD domain name registrations and their authoritative name servers, as well as modifications to existing domain names.  The changes are then copied to the other 12 root servers.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Second Level Domain
A second level domain is a subsection of a Top Level Domain (TLD) in the Domain Name System.  An example of a second level domain would be leestreet.com.

Secondary Server
A secondary server is one of a pair of two servers that make up a set of Domain Name Servers.  Generally, Domain Name Servers are grouped in pairs, with a primary and a secondary server.  The primary server is responsible for updating the secondary name server with any new zone file information or modifications that have been submitted by the DNS administrator.

Security Certificate
A security certificate is a digital identification sequence that allows for identity verification or Web sites security verification on the Internet.

Server
A server is a software program that is designed to accept and carry out requests and queries initiated by a client program.  Servers and clients may exist on the same computer or different computers connected to the Internet.  An example of a server is a Web server, which is a computer running software configured to answer requests for Web sites by serving up the files that comprise a Web sites to the computer that is requesting them, typically via a Web browser.

Service Mark
A service mark is a logo, phrase, word, name or any other identifying mark that indicates a service, that has been registered through the proper government-approved authority to represent that service. Registered service marks are protected from infringement through the registering agency.

SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is a protocol, or method, that is used for sending e-mail on the Internet.  This protocol is typically used in conjunction with POP (post office protocol), the method commonly used for retrieving electronic mail from a mail server on the Internet. Most e-mail programs allow you to specify both an SMTP and POP server. Access to or the name of an SMTP server is something that is typically provided by an ISP.

SRS
The Shared Registration System (SRS) is a universal database system of available .com, Net and .org domain names that was developed by Network Solutions, Inc. as a requirement to allow ICANN accredited registrars the ability to register and modify domain names in the registry.  This system prevents a domain name that is successfully registered through one registrar from being registered through another domain name registration site.

SSL
SSL, or Secure Sockets Layer, is a protocol (method) developed by Netscape that provides Internet users using HTTP with the ability to secure the transmission of information on the Internet between a client (Web browser) and a server.
 Please see Security Certificate.

Start of Authority (SOA) Resource Record
The SOA Record, as it relates to a zone file, indicates that the Domain Name Server that the file is residing on is the authoritative Domain Name Server for the domain name.  Essentially, the SOA Record contains caching and expiration "instructions" that are communicated to the DNS when zone file information is received for a domain name.

Subdomain
A subdomain is a level of division of the domain name space.  Every domain names that exists on the Internet can be divided up into an infinite number of subdomains.  For example, in the URL mydomain.leestreet.com, "mydomain" is considered a subdomain.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

TCP/IP
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is the name of the language, or protocol, used for Internet communications.  This protocol establishes the way that data is transported over the Internet in the form of packets.

Technical Contact
The technical contact associated with a domain name is the individual or contact responsible for handling the technical aspects of a domain name, such as specifying the authoritative DNS for a domain name. The technical contact information is kept on file with the registrar of the domain name and is also visible in the WHOIS database.

Third Level Domain
See Domain Alias.

Top Level Domain (TLD)
A Top Level Domain (TLD) is the highest-level category of Internet names.  The domain name space is divided into several TLDs.  .com, net, .org, .gov, .mil and .edu are examples of global Top Level Domains (gTLD).  .tv, .cx, .md, and .ac are examples of country code Top Level Domains (ccTLD).  Domain names are registered within a Top Level Domain (TLD). The two-letter domains are country specific. While some country code top-level domains are restricted, most are openly available and can be registered by anyone. Regardless of whether the top-level domain is generic or country specific, they are all just beneath the "root," or the dot, which is the start of the hierarchy.

Trademark
A trademark is a logo, phrase, word, name or any other identifying mark that indicates a product or service, which has been registered through the proper government-approved authority to represent that product or service.  Registered trademarks are protected from infringement by the registering agency.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

URL (Uniform Resource Locator)
A URL is an address that locates a file on the Internet that is generally comprised of a domain name, a Domain Alias, one or more directories and a page or file name.  This structure allows Internet users to type an alphanumeric address into a Web browser and access the files that comprise a Web site.  An example of a URL is: http://www.leestreet.com/contact/#e-mail.

URL Forwarding
URL Forwarding is a service that allows users to link or redirect their registered domain name to an existing Web site at another URL.  For instance, using the service, one could redirect users who type www.chicago-apartments-rent.com into a Web browser to a destination URL or Web site such as: http://www.leestreet.com. It is typical, but not necessary, for the owner of the forwarding domain name and the owner of the destination domain name to be the same person or party.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Variable Term Registration
Variable Term Registration allows domain name holders the flexibility to register  .gov, .edu, TV, .com, Net and .org domain names for a term of 1,2, 5 or 10 years. Generally, a discount or special features may be offered to encourage the purchase of a longer registration term.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Web Browser
A Web browser is a client program used to view, search for and send/receive files on the Internet, including text files, graphics and other information.  Commonly used Web browsers include Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. See Browser

The browser type, release version and operating system (if available)
on the computer you are using right now is:



You can prove the above by opening this page in a different browser.
New information will be displayed.


Web Server
A Web server is a software program that runs on a computer connected to the Internet.  These computers, or servers, are configured to answer requests for Web sites by serving up the files that comprise a Web site to the computer that is requesting them, typically via a Web browser.

Web Site
A Web site is one or more files contained on a Web server, or a directory of a Web server, that can contain information in the form of text, graphics, etc. and can be accessed by typing a URL into a Web browser.

Webmaster
A Webmaster is generally considered to be the individual(s) responsible for creating and maintaining a Web site.  Webmasters are often outside contractors involved in designing the site, developing content and assisting in the domain name registration process for their clients. Where a webmaster is not specifically identified within a site, that site was likely a collaborative effort of many internal and external professionals.

WHOIS
A WHOIS database is a database that is maintained by a registrar, containing information about the domain names that have been registered through that particular registrar.  The information provided by a WHOIS database includes the organization, the name, e-mail address, phone numbers and fax numbers for various contacts associated with the domain name.
 Every domain name registrar is required to create and maintain a WHOIS database for all domain names registered through their company.

www (World Wide Web)
The abbreviation "www" stands for World Wide Web.  The World Wide Web is generally considered to be the group of Internet users and servers that use hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) to send and receive information over the Internet.

In many cases, www is used as a Domain Alias, when entered at the beginning of a URL. For example, http://leestreet.com and http://www.leestreet.com are both configured to access the same Web site.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

X
There are no entries for the letter X.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Y
There are no entries for the letter Y.

Back to the top


.  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Zone
A zone is a piece of the total domain name space that is represented by a primary and secondary Domain Name Server (DNS).  Zones can be of different sizes and can contain different information, stored on any number of network devices connected to the Internet.

Zone Contact
The zone contact associated with a domain name is the individual or contact responsible for handling certain technical aspects of a domain name, such as specifying IP Address, Domain Alias, and MX Record Information for a domain name.  The zone contact information is kept on file with the registrar of the domain name and is also visible in the WHOIS database.
 The zone contact, in most cases, is the same as the technical contact for a domain name.

Zone File
A zone file is an entry on a Domain Name Server (DNS) that specifies the IP Address, Domain Alias, MX Record and Start of Authority information for a domain name.  The DNS then uses the zone file to respond to queries for domain name resolution information.
 Zone files are generally created and maintained by the administrator of the DNS that the domain name lists as authoritative in the root servers.

Back to the top



Lee Street Home   |   About Us  |   Our Neighborhood  |   Apartment Finder  |   Available Apartments  |   Application Forms  |   Our Properties  |   FAQS  |   Moving In  |   Maintenance Request  |   Chicagoland's Attractions  |   Our Lease  |   Residents Only  |   Find Us  |   Contact Us  |   SEARCH SITE

Terms of Use   •   Privacy Policy   •   Equal Housing Opportunity   Equal Housing Opportunity Chicago Apartments for Rent
© Copyright Lee Street Management 1999-2012